Using magazines picture to write a dialog

Depending on the purpose of the activity, a task can take up five minutes at the beginning or end of a class, or last 20 minutes or more in the main part of the class. Preparation Choosing Pictures Pictures are illustrations that are cut from a magazine, newspapers or other sources.

Using magazines picture to write a dialog

Depending on the purpose of the activity, a task can take up five minutes at the beginning or end of a class, or last 20 minutes or more in the main part of the class. Preparation Choosing Pictures Pictures are illustrations that are cut from a magazine, newspapers or other sources.

They're mostly photographs, but drawings, collages, maps or other illustrations can be used for certain activities. Each picture should be at least 13 x 18 cm, but preferably about 20 x 25 cm, i. Pictures are easier to use without any printed text on them. You will only be able to use pictures with text for certain activities.

If pictures do include text, the text should be in English. Collecting the pictures Students like colorful and varied materials. Available sources for pictures are glossy magazines, TV guides, the Sunday supplements of newspapers, and so on.

You can collect the pictures yourself, or ask your students to bring them in for you. Your own selections will probably focus on pictures for discussions, games, and teaching vocabulary.

Students are good at getting pictures of famous people, sports and objects they like, which gives you a good opportunity to learn about students' interests. Sorting the Pictures When you have a stack of pictures, you will notice that some cutouts seem perfect for teaching vocabulary for example, clothes, furniture and other pictures will be appropriate for guessing games.

Try to identify a structure or function that can be practiced with each picture. You should paste the pictures on letter-sized paper, and punch holes in them to keep them in a binder. You can sort them out by level or grade, by activity or by topic.

You can write notes on the back of the sheets. Sample Activities Below, I'll describe nine activities that can be done with magazine cutouts. These are just a few examples of what can be done with pictures.

using magazines picture to write a dialog

As you start using pictures in new and creative ways, you will come up with many variations. Textbooks may also give you ideas for working with pictures. Vocabulary Building or Review Language focus: Sets of two pictures that show similar people or related situations.

You'll need one set per pair of students. If you want to review specific material, choose an appropriate set and hand out a set of photocopies to each pair of students. Show a sample set and ask students if the pictures are similar, and how they are different. Give pairs of students two pictures.

Tell them write a list of 10 differences. If you want to turn this into a competition, the first pair to find ten differences is the winner. Guided Practice Language focus: Pictures of faces or people expressing different feelings and moods.

Teach or review adjectives describing moods and feelings: Hand out pictures and ask students to describe how the people feel, and why they feel that way.

How to extend a quote over multiple paragraphs

What happened that made them feel this way? As a follow up, students can present their descriptions to the group, and their classmates can add additional information about the person in the picture.

Example of student production: This man is tired.

using magazines picture to write a dialog

He probably has a lot of work. He has a lot of stress. Maybe he has a problem at work. Grammar "If I were there8 Tips for Using Quotes and Dialogue in Your Blog Posts Posted By Guest Blogger 23rd of August Writing Content 0 Comments This guest post is by Aman Basanti of monstermanfilm.com Dialogue will flow and read more naturally on the page if you train yourself to write the way you hear people around you speaking.

Problem: Punctuating Dialogue Periods, commas, ellipses, quotation marks, tigers, bears you get the idea. What You Can Do With a Magazine. 10 Creative ESL Speaking Activities. by Claudia Pesce 94, views. Choose a photo from a magazine - make sure it's a scene where there's a lot going on, like an airport, restaurant, a family doing things outdoors.

Write a list of topics that correspond to those headlines. Ask students to match the right. How to: Save Files Using the SaveFileDialog Component. 03/30/; 3 minutes to read Contributors.

Let’s Start with the Basics

all; The dialog box returns the path and name of the file the user has selected in the dialog box. However, you must write the code to actually write the files to disk. Final thoughts on writing dialogue for Conversational UI 👯‍ Here you have it: a few tips on how to write better dialogue for Conversational UI.

Take these guidelines and your chatbot should come to life and deliver some real value — to both you and your customers. How to write strong dialogue in children's books - advice from SCBWI British Isles Southeast Scotland teach-in. “Show not tell” in dialogue: using adverbs in dialogue is another example of the dreaded “telling” that writers must minimise.

Vivid description is more satisfying for readers, who prefer to draw the conclusion that the.

Werff- Using Pictures from Magazines in ESL Classes (TESL/TEFL)